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TechDebt 2020
Mon 25 - Tue 26 May 2020 Yongsan-gu, Seoul, South Korea
co-located with ICSE 2020

Welcome to the website of TechDebt 2020.

Technical debt describes a universal software development phenomenon: design or implementation constructs that are expedient in the short term but set up a technical context that can make future changes more costly or impossible. Software developers and managers increasingly use the concept to communicate key tradeoffs related to release and quality issues. The goal of this two-day conference is to bring together leading software researchers, practitioners, and tool vendors to explore theoretical and practical techniques that manage technical debt.

The Managing Technical Debt workshop series has provided a forum since 2010 for practitioners and researchers to discuss issues related to technical debt and share emerging practices used in software-development organizations. A week-long Dagstuhl Seminar on Managing Technical Debt in Software Engineering has produced a consensus definition for technical debt, a draft conceptual model, and a research roadmap.

To accelerate progress, an expanded two-day working conference format has become essential. The third edition of the TechDebt Conference will be held jointly with ICSE 2020 in Seoul, South Korea, on May 25-26, 2019. The conference is sponsored by ACM SIGSOFT and IEEE TCSE.

News

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Tools Track

The Third International Conference on Technical Debt will be held in Seoul, Korea, on May 25–26, 2020, collocated with ICSE 2020.

Technical debt is a metaphor that software developers and managers increasingly use to communicate key trade-offs between time to market and quality issues.

While other software engineering disciplines—such as software maintenance and evolution, refactoring, software quality, and empirical software engineering—have produced results relevant to managing technical debt, none of them alone suffice to model, manage, and communicate the different facets of the design trade-off problems involved in managing technical debt. Similarly, while many software engineering practices can be used to get ahead of technical debt, organizations struggle with managing technical debt routinely and strategically.

Tools play a critical role in understanding the management, monitoring, and measurement of technical debt in real-world situations. We invite researchers, practitioners and organizations to showcase new techniques, methods, and tools that can aid practitioners and decision makers in these critical tasks to participate in TechDebt 2020.

Submission types

Tools track accepts two types of submissions:

  • Tool presentation papers (up to 5 pages): describe innovative and original tools addressing technical debt issues or aiming at the management of technical debt. Submitted tool papers will be peer-reviewed and accepted submissions will be published in the conference proceedings. Tool papers need to include the subtitle “Tool presentation paper”.
  • Extended abstract (1-2 pages): Although extended abstracts are not peer reviewed, abstracts will be screened to ensure they meet the expectations of the tools track and are aligned with the overarching technical debt theme of the conference. Extended abstracts provide practitioners with an opportunity to showcase a tool-specific perspective.

Suggested content For both types of submissions, the program committee and chairs will look for:

  • The alignment to the overarching technical debt theme of the conference.
  • How the purpose of the tool is addressed and how validation experiences with practitioners have been planned or conducted (if applicable)

If a longer experience report is available, we suggest the authors consider submissions to the main track’s experience-reports category and submit a companion extended abstract focusing on the tool itself to this track.

Submission process

In EasyChair, on top of specifying the type of submission, indicate how you will participate in the conference session (you may select one or both):

  • Panel participant: In the panel discussion we will engage participants and audience on how the showcased tools help address technical debt challenges.
  • Tool demonstration: If you propose to showcase your tool or product from your organization, please let us know your power and space requirements. A dedicated demo session will be part of the Tools track.

All accepted papers will also have the possibility to bring a poster during the conference.

Papers must be submitted electronically via the TechDebtConf2020 EasyChair site. Submissions must be in PDF and conform to the ACM formatting guidelines applied for ICSE 2020. Submissions may not exceed the number of pages specified above (including all text, references and figures). Purchases of additional pages in the proceedings is not allowed.

Formatting instructions are available at https://www.acm.org/publications/proceedings-template for both LaTeX and Word users. LaTeX users must use the provided acmart.cls and ACM-Reference-Format.bst without modification, enable the conference format in the preamble of the document (i.e., \documentclass[sigconf,review]{acmart}), and use the ACM reference format for the bibliography (i.e., \bibliographystyle{ACM-Reference-Format}). The review option adds line numbers, thereby allowing referees to refer to specific lines in their comments.

The official publication date is the date the proceedings are made available in the ACM or IEEE Digital Libraries. This date may be up to two weeks prior to the first day of ICSE 2020. The official publication date affects the deadline for any patent filings related to published work.

Accepted papers must be presented in person at the conference by one of the authors. Accepted submissions will be published as part of the ICSE co-located events proceedings.

Important dates:

  • January 27: Tool presentation papers (up to 5 pages) submitted to EasyChair
  • February 20: Extended abstracts (up to 2 pages) submitted to EasyChair
  • March 2: Notification of acceptance or rejection
  • March 15: Camera-ready submission of final paper or extended abstract
  • March 17: Early Registration
  • May 25–26: Conference, panel and demos

Further inquiries

All inquiries may be directed to track chairs: Zadia zcodabux@cs.usask.ca or Fabian fabian.gilson@canterbury.ac.nz.

Call for Papers

The Third International Conference on Technical Debt (TechDebt 2020) will be held in Seoul, Korea, on May 25–26, 2020, collocated with the 42nd International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2020).

Technical debt is a metaphor that software developers and managers increasingly use to communicate key trade-offs between time to market and software quality issues.

While other software engineering disciplines—such as software maintenance and evolution, refactoring, software quality, and empirical software engineering—have produced results relevant to managing technical debt, none of them alone suffice to model, manage, and communicate the different facets of the trade-off problems involved in managing technical debt. Similarly, while many software engineering practices can be used to get ahead of technical debt, organizations struggle with managing technical debt routinely and strategically.

TechDebt 2020 aims to bring together leading software engineering researchers and practitioners to explore theoretical and practical techniques for managing technical debt and to share experiences, challenges, and best practices.

The conference addresses all topics related to technical debt, including

  • Concept and scope of technical debt
  • The business case for technical debt management
  • Understanding causes and effects of technical debt
  • Organizational and management debt
  • Technical debt management within software life-cycle management
  • Technical debt and requirements engineering (including requirements debt)
  • Technical debt in design and architecture (including architectural debt)
  • Technical debt and testing
  • Technical debt and software evolution, maintenance, and aging (including documentation debt)
  • Analysis, visualization and measurement of technical debt
  • Economic models for describing or reasoning about technical debt
  • Techniques and tools for calculating technical debt principal and interest
  • Concrete practices and tools used to manage technical debt
  • Debt remediation and refactoring
  • AI and machine learning to manage technical debt
  • Technical debt in multi-cultural and distributed development
  • Technical debt and DevOps
  • Technical debt in software models
  • Technical debt and quality attributes, such as security (especially at run-time)
  • Technical debt in (ultra-) large-scale systems, ecosystems, platforms and product lines
  • Technical debt in data-intensive systems
  • Technical debt in distributed systems (including server-less, mobile, IoT)
  • Beyond software—technical debt in systems engineering
  • Exploratory studies of technical debt in practice
  • Success and failure stories of technical debt management
  • Replication of studies related to technical debt
  • Meta-studies on technical debt
  • Education and training related to technical debt

We invite submissions of papers to the Technical Track in any areas related to the theme and goal of the conference in the following categories:

  • Research Papers (up to 10 pages): innovative and significant original research in the field
  • Experience Papers (up to 10 pages): industrial experience, case studies, challenges, problems, and solutions
  • Education and Training Papers (up to 10 pages): experiences, approaches and tools for teaching topics in academic courses or industrial training (e.g., lesson plans, assignments)
  • Short Papers (up to 5 pages): position and future trend papers describing ongoing research or new results, descriptions or examples of problems and solutions in real-life settings that pose fundamental or characteristic challenges

If you would like to submit a tool demo or description of a tool (either to complement your submission to the Technical Track or as a separate submission), please refer to the Tools Track of TechDebt 2020.

Submissions must be original and unpublished work. Each paper submitted to the main Technical Track will undergo a rigorous review process by at least three members of the program committee.

TechDebt 2020 adopts a double-blind review process for the main Technical Track (only). Therefore, all submissions to this track have to fulfill the double-blind reviewing requirements. Any submission that does not comply with these requirements may be desk-rejected without further review.

Evaluation criteria:

  • Relevance: Submission must respond to Call for Papers.
  • Soundness: Are all claimed contributions supported by the rigorous application of appropriate research methods? Claims should be scoped to what can be supported, and limitations should be discussed.
  • Significance: Are contributions evaluated for their importance and impact with respect to the existing body of knowledge? The authors are expected to explicitly argue for the relevance and usefulness of the research and discuss the novelty of the claimed contributions through a comparison with pertinent related work.
  • Novelty: Is there sufficient originality in the contribution, and is it clearly and correctly explained with respect to the state of the art?
  • Replicability: Is there sufficient information in the paper for the results to be independently replicated? The evaluation of submissions will take into account the extent to which sufficient information is available to support the full or partial independent replication of the claimed findings.
  • Presentation Quality: Are results clearly presented? Submissions are expected to meet high standards of presentation, including adequate use of the English language, absence of major ambiguity, clearly readable figures and tables, and respect of the formatting instructions.

The weighting and relevance of the above criteria varies for paper types.

TechDebt 2020 would like to foster Open Science Practices to increase accessibility, reproducibility, and replicability of research.

Papers must be submitted electronically via the TechDebtConf2020 EasyChair site. Submissions must be in PDF and conform to the ACM formatting guidelines applied for ICSE 2020. Submissions may not exceed the number of pages specified above (including all text, references and figures). Purchases of additional pages in the proceedings is not allowed.

Formatting instructions are available at https://www.acm.org/publications/proceedings-template for both LaTeX and Word users. LaTeX users must use the provided acmart.cls and ACM-Reference-Format.bst without modification, enable the conference format in the preamble of the document (i.e., \documentclass[sigconf,review]{acmart}), and use the ACM reference format for the bibliography (i.e., \bibliographystyle{ACM-Reference-Format}). The review option adds line numbers, thereby allowing referees to refer to specific lines in their comments.

The official publication date is the date the proceedings are made available in the ACM or IEEE Digital Libraries. This date may be up to two weeks prior to the first day of ICSE 2020. The official publication date affects the deadline for any patent filings related to published work.

Excellent papers will be considered for a Best Paper Award and invited to submit an extended version of their paper to a Special Issue of Elsevier’s Information & Software Technology journal.

Important dates:

  • January 10, 2020: Abstracts submission to EasyChair
  • January 17, 2020: Papers submission to EasyChair
  • March 2, 2020: Notification of acceptance or rejection
  • March 15, 2020: Camera-ready papers
  • March 17, 2020: Early registration
  • May 25–26, 2020: Conference

Speaker: Laurie Williams

Laurie Williams

Laurie Williams is a Distinguished Professor in the Computer Science Department of the College of Engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU). Laurie is a co-director of the NCSU Science of Security Lablet sponsored by the National Security Agency and the NCSU Secure Computing Institute. Laurie’s research focuses on software security; agile software development practices and processes, particularly continuous deployment; and software reliability, software testing and analysis. In 2018, Laurie was named an IEEE Fellow for contributions to reliable and secure software engineering. Laurie is an ACM Distinguished Scientist and has received the ACM SIGSOFT Influential Educator Award. Laurie received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Utah, her MBA from Duke University, and her BS in Industrial Engineering from Lehigh University. She worked for IBM Corporation for nine years before returning to academia.



Speaker: Florian Deissenboeck

Florian Deissenboeck

Florian Deissenboeck received his doctorate from Technical University Munich for his work on software quality models. Since 2005 he has been an active member of the software engineering research community and was awarded with the Most Influential Paper Award at the International Conference on Program Comprehension 2015 and the International Conference on Software Maintenance and Evolution 2017. In 2009 he co-founded CQSE GmbH, a company that offers the software intelligence platform Teamscale as well as innovative services that that help its customers to evaluate, control and improve the quality of their software. As head of the software auditing services, he develops new approaches for software audits and analyzes grown software systems in various industries.

Steering Committee

Paris Avgeriou, University of Groningen
Philippe Kruchten, University of British Columbia
Robert L. Nord, Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Ipek Ozkaya, Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute
Carolyn Seaman, University of Maryland Baltimore County

Program Committee

To be completed upon invitation deadline

TechDebt Conference

To accelerate progress, an expanded two-day working conference format has become essential. The inaugural edition of the TechDebt Conference was held jointly with ICSE 2018 in Gothenburg, Sweden, May 27–28, 2018. Researchers, practitioners, and tool vendors explored theoretical and practical techniques that manage technical debt.

Conference Program Proceedings
TechDebt 2019 ICSE Second International Conference on Technical Debt ACM digital library
TechDebt 2018 ICSE First International Conference on Technical Debt ACM digital library

Dagstuhl Seminar: Managing Technical Debt in Software Engineering

A week-long Dagstuhl Seminar on Managing Technical Debt in Software Engineering, April 17 – 22 , 2016, has produced a consensus definition for technical debt, a draft conceptual model, and a research roadmap.

International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt Series

The Managing Technical Debt workshop series has provided a forum since 2010 for practitioners and researchers to discuss issues related to technical debt and share emerging practices used in software-development organizations. Browse the workshop collections.

Workshop Presentations Proceedings Summary
MTD 2017 @ XP Ninth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt ACM digital library Technical Debt in Agile Development: Report on the Ninth Workshop on Managing Technical Debt (MTD 2017), ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 42, Issue 3, July 2017, pages 18-21.
MTD 2016 @ ICSME Eighth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt IEEE Xplore Technical Debt: A Research Roadmap Report on the Eighth Workshop on Managing Technical Debt (MTD 2016), ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 42, Issue 1, January 2017, pages 28-31.
MTD 2015 @ ICSME Seventh International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt IEEE Xplore Technical Debt: Broadening Perspectives Report on the Seventh Workshop on Managing Technical Debt (MTD 2015), ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 41, Issue 2, March 2016, pages 38-41.
MTD 2014 @ ICSME Sixth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt IEEE Xplore Technical Debt: Beyond Definition to Understanding Report on the Sixth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt, ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 40, Issue 2, March 2015, pages 32-34.
MTD 2013b @ ESEIW Fifth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt N/A Technical debt at the crossroads of research and practice: report on the fifth international workshop on managing technical debt, ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 39, Issue 2, March 2014, pages 31-33.
MTD 2013a @ ICSE Fourth International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt IEEE Xplore Technical debt: towards a crisper definition report on the 4th international workshop on managing technical debt, ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 38, Issue 5, September 2013, pages 51-54.
MTD 2012 @ ICSE Third International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt IEEE Xplore Technical debt in software development: from metaphor to theory report on the third international workshop on managing technical debt, ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 37, Issue 5, September 2012, pages 36-38.
MTD 2011 @ ICSE Second International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt ACM digital library Managing technical debt in software development: report on the 2nd international workshop on managing technical debt, held at ICSE 2011, ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 36, Issue 5, September 2011, pages 33-35.
MTD 2010 First International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt N/A Managing Technical Debt in Software-Reliant Systems, FSE/SDP Workshop on the Future of Software Engineering Research, 2010.
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